laura makabresku

All photos by 25 year old Polish photographer Laura Makabresku are startlingly beautiful and powerful in the authenticity of the emotions they cast out. These photos have an uncommonly ethereal and natural intensity about them. And looking at them makes us feel as if the world around us has disappeared, only to be replaced by oddly sincere and illusory new settings. Laura’s affinity for constructing fantastical scenes wrought with an odd sense of familiarity and comfort is greatly evident, and nothing short of remarkable.

You incorporate various animals into your photos, how do you acquire them? And can you explain their significance to your photos?

These animals are an inseparable part of my fairy tales. I surround myself with them, because then I feel like I’m in a safer world; one which I created when I was just a little girl. Most of my childhood was spent in the country.My grandfather was taking care of an old house of his neighbor who was a huntsman. We would go there together and he always let me play with the stuffed animals. As a matter of fact, it was then, in that room that my fairy tales started to grow in me, and I tell them to this very day.
What photos have you taken that you feel the most emotionally connected to?

There is a collection of photos I took just before my Lad’s heart surgery. They tell the story of his heart, which was ill. I’m thinking about this photo: http://www.flickr.com/photos/lauramakabresku/7530257410/in/photostream

Describe your work in three words.

Darkness, sensitiveness, death.

You shoot both outdoors and indoors, which do you prefer?

I’d rather shoot indoors. The outside world frightens me (but sometimes I take photos in the woods, this is a perfect background for my fairy tales).

I like being minimalistic, so I’d rather shoot in my empty room, with the wall as the background. When I photograph I’m focusing on a story which I want to tell. Nevertheless I only take photos in the daylight.

In most photos where you are the subject, your face cannot be seen by the viewer, is this intentional?I think that at this moment even I don’t know the true meaning of hiding my face in my photos. As I said earlier, I’m focusing on gesture, light and shadows.

What emotions and thoughts do you hope to communicate to those who view your works?

I don’t know exactly what kind of emotions my photos evoke in those who view my works. But I know precisely what kind of emotions are in me, before I create a photo, and reading comments of various people I can notice that they feel something similar: longing, anxiety, sometimes even fear.